Paul Vaughan article on WUWT showing long term solar/lunar phase relationships

Paul Vaughan says:

Credit: Climatology animations have been assembled using JRA-25 Atlas [ http://ds.data.jma.go.jp/gmd/jra/atlas/eng/atlas-tope.htm ] images. JRA-25 long-term reanalysis is a collaboration of Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) & Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI).

[many more links to animations of the atmospheric effects due to solar declinational /seasonal movements follow below, showing the solar effects I/you should include into my ideas] (more…)

Filed under: In other online forums,Long-term Lunar Effects,Natural Processes,Supporting Research — by Richard Holle @ 8:10 pm on October 15, 2011

Earth’s Thermohaline Circulation

Here’s some background on Earth’s Thermohaline Circulation;
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermohaline_circulation
http://www.cmar.csiro.au/currents/global/CSIRO_Conveyor_Oceans_M.wmv

NASA’s Ocean Motion page offers some good insights;
http://oceanmotion.org/html/impact/conveyor.htm

as does this page;
http://www.windows2universe.org/earth/Water/deep_ocean.html

[Lunar tidal effects mentioned toward the bottom of this lengthy informational comment, good resource as usual from just the facts]

(more…)

Filed under: In other online forums,Long-term Lunar Effects,Natural Processes — by Richard Holle @ 9:17 pm on September 18, 2011

Sea ice thermostat process and deep ocean temperatures

DocMartyn says:
August 13, 2011 at 2:10 pm

In all seriousness I wish to know why the bottoms of the oceans are much colder than the surface.
I know the surface gets sunlight during the day and radiates heat at night.
What I don’t understand is why radiant heat is not trapped at the bottom.
Why is IR radiation from the surface not been trapped at the bottom of the ocean?
——————–Reply;
when the polar ice at either pole freezes in its respective winter, it squeezes out most of the salt that accumulates into the close to 2c sea water that then becomes denser than the warmer or fresher water, due to both the fact that water gets densest at around 4 to 2 degrees C and the more salt is added to the solution. This colder denser salter water drops to the bottom of the oceans and spreads out covering the worlds ocean floors, Most of the heat loss from the poles is moved this way, when the heat loss is fast enough then sea ice forms and as it thickens it starts to insulate the 4 to 6 degree C sea water, as it spreads it regulates the limit of heat that can escape into space. (more…)

Filed under: In other online forums,Long-term Lunar Effects,Natural Processes — by Richard Holle @ 5:04 pm on August 13, 2011

More big picture ideas

Richard Hollesays:

I am of the opinion that the process is an ongoing long fizz not a big bang. Where matter accumulates, it is drawn gravitationally into stellar growth with attendant planets, all suspended on the magnetic forces balancing between the gravitational attractions, whether as Miles suggests by electromagnetic repulsion, or just by virtue of the clumping of magnetic conduction thru the magnetically permeable materials, and homopolar generator driven effects of the spin orbit coupling between bodies as they share the greater flux of the Galactic magnet fields, they are suspended on. (more…)

Filed under: In other online forums,Long-term Lunar Effects,Natural Processes,Supporting Research — by Richard Holle @ 3:57 am on August 9, 2011

Leroux, Marcel (1993). The Mobile Polar High:=Lunar declinational tides

Paul Vaughan says:
July 2, 2011 at 10:35 am
Dave Springer wrote (July 2, 2011 at 6:59 am)
“There is a chicken-egg paradox that remains controversial. The controversy is whether weather drives rotation rate changes or rotation rate change drives the weather. Either way there is strong correlation between changing winds and changing rotation rate. Winds are definitely a big factor in SST oscillations. […] heretofore I was unaware of a connection between earth rotation rate and wind patterns. Rotation rate changes are so small I thought it could be ignored for all practical matters. I’m still not convinced it shouldn’t be ignored.”

There’s no controversy here Dave. It has been known for decades that pole-equator contrasts induced by the seasons drive the westerlies and hence atmospheric angular momentum and changes in length of day. If your objective is to know what time it is, go ahead and ignore the changes, but if your objective is to understand terrestrial climate, see the following:
Leroux, Marcel (1993). The Mobile Polar High: a new concept explaining present mechanisms of meridional air-mass and energy exchanges and global propagation of palaeoclimatic changes. Global and Planetary Change 7, 69-93.
http://ddata.over-blog.com/xxxyyy/2/32/25/79/Leroux-Global-and-Planetary-Change-1993.pdf

Please take however much time is necessary to understand. The discussion cannot advance until people make the effort to understand the basics. (more…)

Filed under: In other online forums,Long-term Lunar Effects,Natural Processes,Supporting Research — by Richard Holle @ 3:05 am on July 3, 2011