Developing nations problems are related to lack of new ideas

Richard Holle says:

October 17, 2010 at 11:34 am

OG says:
October 16, 2010 at 4:23 pm

“”The war that will last a generation is the one between the developed world and the developing world, in which developed-world NGO’s are the main antagonists against the world’s poor. Our ‘aid’ agencies’ belief that countries can rise from poverty by becoming dependent on handouts from developed nations has been failing for generations, but nobody seems to have noticed.””
__________Reply;
Giving handouts to those who you would not trust enough to let into your home or office unsupervised, is what people do for the homeless panhandlers.

They seem to be everywhere but invisible, so no permanent progress is made.

On the international scale undeveloped countries are just that, lacking in the basic infrastructure to generate the commerce needed to become stable enough to be able to attract the capital investment from the international corporations and banking systems, that only want to profit by being able to utilize the cheap labor or other local resources available.

All new international business growth investment is funneled into areas where there is an advantage to be gained from investing. The basic infrastructure of an available set of conditions needs to be in place for that to happen. Transportation, exploitable natural resources, cheap trainable usable labor force, water, agriculture, food production capabilities able to meet more than basic needs.

In the past concentrations of Capitalism took the form of governments with borders, that ran on constructive sets of laws that allowed it to prosper and grow.

In the current global economy the profit motive is interred into international corporations and their associated banking systems, it is only a matter of time before the monopolies that result from normal business practices, form as a result and the “international political, monetary, and trade deficits”=”merger wars” that are currently going on will be over.

What are now felt as the manipulations of the governments found inside borders, by the fragmented global economic competition, that results in the political motivations to con the taxpayers and consumers into supporting the whole scheme, is the underlying game the system and all consumers are scripted into.

Those peoples in undeveloped countries are sidelined because they are not structurally configured to be viable players, due to some lack of critical components in the basic requirements to attract serious investment, and as such are only given handouts to prevent them from further gross deterioration, see above or ie;
(Transportation, exploitable natural resources, cheap trainable usable labor force, water, agriculture, food production capabilities able to meet more than basic needs.)

These are the basic things to work on, starting with a local government structure that puts these goals ahead of, their own search for controlling the governed people through having regulative power. Because the resultant bureaucratic regulation aspect, only slows down growth, depletes the resources, and the drive of the population to be as productive as they can be.

The NGO’s you mention are the base of the problems, funding their efforts is counterproductive. The dependency on the hand outs (welfare system) stops the development process faster than anything.

Nobody pays attention to the non-players in a game, only the most active are focused on as relevant, which begets the politics and rent seeking behavior, that produces the resultant corruption, that just disrupts, diverts, and stagnates the potential productivity

In the long run it matters not the left/right bias of the teams, it is the concerted efforts and effects of the composite number of (the global population) players, toward the goal of increasing the infrastructure and efficiency of the global system that makes progress possible for all.

wealth, economic growth, and plant growth depend on available nutrients and positive growth conditions to thrive, spend your time and resources “building the soil” not cutting weeds.

Filed under: Natural Processes,Uncategorized — by Richard Holle @ 11:59 am on October 17, 2010

Comments

There are no comments yet...Kick things off by filling out the form below.

Leave a Comment